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Gymnastic Bodies Foundation One PDF



Well F1 by itself won't get you all the way to the final element. But it will cover the base foundation ( hence the name...) needed to nail those elements. you barely even use rings in F1. You don't even get into tuck levers, but the elements shown will DEFINITELY help.




Gymnastic Bodies Foundation One PDF



FiN: I think that, for now, your primary training should focus on the Foundation work, for this sake of finding weak links and strengthening your foundation. Your concern (I think?) is that this is basically throwing out a lot of other work that has been your primary training for many months.


Personally, I don't think you will lose a great deal if you drop those old 'basic' elements for now in favour of the new foundation preparatory elements. You will still be training, indirectly, muscles, movements, and motor patterns which will benefit the more exercises you had been working on.


The foundation work only takes 20-40 minutes a day. It certainly does not preclude you from performing other work that you find more fun at the same time. If you want to skip ahead and work on levers and such while also still doing the foundation, then do the foundation workout, and spend your remaining time playing around with levers. You'll quickly find that the foundation work is greatly beneficial.


For people who want to do more, Lord knows that the foundation work isn't going to leave you dead for the rest of the day. There's plenty of energy left to go do whatever seems fun after the important stuff (foundation work) is completed.


I think that once you have the product, and see what the actual training commitment is, you will realize that you're definitely not going to need to exclusively do the foundation series. There's both plenty of time AND energy left to do just about anything you want.


I don't have a problem with the costing or value of the product - it's just that I am personally not ready to commit to the long-term process of re-inventing myself right now. I may be in a few months perhaps. As well has having certain physical and mental concerns, my training and sport situation has been in flux and I am hoping to settle that soon. So I am backing off for now, but certainly encourage anyone who is ready to embrace it. When there are other ways to support the GB community and gymnastics in general, I am certainly willing to put my money where my mouth is.


FiN, unless your form is particularly horrible the best thing to do would be to focus on foundation 1 and then maintain your current abilities with whatever your minimum training investment to actually maintain those abilities is. 1-2 sets per training day is probably plenty.


If there are 6 exercises for each foundation movement/hold in each foundation ebook each with a cycle of 12 weeks before progressing to the next exercise/hold then that would be 72 weeks per ebook. Multiplied by 4 gives 288 weeks or around 5 and a half years to master a FL, sPL etc.


One of the biggest issues in the average fitness 'program' is they only are good for a few months at best. Then it's on to something entirely different. This approach just doesn't work in gymnastics training which is based on progression. Coach Sommer has taken this concept to it's pinnacle in his application of the progression principle to GST and not just skills. That's why his athletes are the strongest.


Don't do that. Your willingness to go back and master the basics is admirable, but there's little use in 'mastering' exercises that you can already perform. What you should be doing is testing yourself on each PE/IM pair, and working those ones which you are unable to demonstrate mastery of. If this is the entire foundation, then there's nothing wrong with that. But you should at least attempt mastery on each exercise so that you are using your time most effectively.


Don't do that. Your willingness to go back and master the basics is admirable, but there's little use in 'mastering' exercises that you can already perform. What you should be doing is testing yourself on each PE/IM pair, and working those ones which you are unable to demonstrate mastery of. If this is the entire foundation, then there's nothing wrong with that. But you should at least attempt mastery on each exercise so that you using your time most effectively.


It depends what you're building a foundation for. Yes, erbs on rings might be too advanced for a 'foundation'. Personally I think erbs on floor would be a reasonable "end point" for the straddle planche series. At that level of strength you'd be very ready to begin working a straddle planche on rings or full planche on floor.


In contrast, because of the background in traditional gymnastic instruction, Gymnastic Bodies teaches strict gymnastic form for exercises, and has specific rules for moving from one progression to the next. This is a classic gymnastic teaching format used for decades by qualified gymnastic coaches. For some people, it can take years to achieve perfect gymnastic form for an exercise progression.


As much as he may have had some influence on how these movements came into the mainstream, bodyweight exercise has clearly been around forever, and the specific use of gymnastic style training for physical conditioning has a long tradition.


"@context": " ", "@type": "Review", "reviewBody": "GymnasticBodies is an online training program for gymnastic strength training developed by Christopher Sommer.", "itemReviewed": "@type": "Product", "name": "GymnasticBodies" "review": "GymnasticBodies is an online training program for gymnastic strength training developed by Christopher Sommer."


If the BJ Miller podcast is the best about living, this one is the best about training. I recently almost started gymnastics training with a coach but I felt to ridiculously under prepared that I felt I needed some.pretraining.


You can do most all the beginning work at home without much equipment. A few items will be essential but a onetime purchase of a doorway pullup bar and gymnastic rings pay for themselves over the course of using them over a number of workouts


I am also interested in this please. I am a golfer and have been doing prolotherapy/platelettreatment on my right elbow. This keeps flaring up when I try progress with GST foundation training. At the moment I am taking it very slow, setting my target on very slow foundation training over the next 200 days. If there is any advise on rehab/strengthening of elbows it would be appreciated. Maybe share what you and Tim have been working on.


Sorry- Also, on the podcast I thought I heard that you would be providing sample videos/links on how to perform some of the movements that you and Coach Sommer discussed, however, the link you attached above for gymasticbodies just takes you to the fundamentals purchase page. Not sure if you have to purchase to obtain those or not. Thanks again


Hi Tim Really liked this episode but it is very hard to visualise some of this stuff without videos or images. The gymnasticbodies.com/tim link does not have any videos, images etc as you have described only a discount coupon for gymnastic bodies.


Personal training stations, knee boards, wood benches, stall ladders, and other types of fitness equipment are helpful for physiotherapy while also providing gymnasts, athletes, and fitness-minded individuals with an opportunity to develop physically. We donate $1 to plant a tree with the National Forest Foundation for every purchase of our gymnastics stall bars and fitness equipment products.


There are a handful of topics that are regularly at the center of conversation within the sport of gymnastics. Drill progressions for skills, strength and conditioning, managing fears, and dealing with pain or injury are among the most discussed.


Between coaching, treating, and consulting in gymnastics around the world, offering advice on flexibility has become a staple in my work. The problem is, between the massive amount of information on the internet, the rapid progression of scientific literature, and the wide range of possible reasons behind why someone struggles with flexibility, it can be absolutely exhausting to learn about and use practically to actually see long term results in the gy.


I meet many well-intentioned gymnastics coaches and parents who are simply looking for an easy to use, but scientifically-backed flexibility program to help the gymnasts they know to increase their flexibility, reduce the risk of injury, and increase their performance.


We will start with some background anatomy, term clarification, and discuss some of the theoretical reasons certain flexibility methods seem to work. From there I will take a deep dive into some cultural issues that exist in gymnastics, and then conclude with step by step flexibility examples for each main region of the body that gymnasts struggle with including the shoulders, hips, ankles, and wrists. I will then end with some important notes on other joints like the knees, elbows, and spine. I hope that this guide can be a place for everyone in gymnastics to find some useful information without feeling so frustrated and overwhelmed.


Before kicking this off, please keep in mind that I wrote an entire book chapter on gymnastics flexibility, which you can download and find for free here. It goes into much more depth than I will in this blog post. The anatomy and theory, as well as some of the joint based material for this blog are taken from that chapter.


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