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I 39;d Rather


Introduction




Have you ever wanted to express your preference for one thing over another? Or maybe you wanted to suggest someone else do something differently? Or perhaps you wished something had happened in another way? If so, then you have probably used the expression "I'd rather".


"I'd rather" is a short form of "I would rather", which is used to talk about what we prefer or want in a given situation. It can also be used to compare two alternatives or possibilities. For example:




i 39;d rather



  • I'd rather have coffee than tea.



  • I'd rather go to the beach than the mountains.



  • I'd rather you didn't smoke in here.



  • I'd rather be rich than famous.



In this article, we will learn how to use "I'd rather" correctly and effectively in different contexts. We will also look at some examples and exercises to practice this expression.


How to use "I'd rather"




The structure of "I'd rather" depends on whether the subject is the same or different in both clauses, and whether we are talking about the present, future, or past. Let's see how it works in each case.


Same subject




When the subject is the same person or thing in both clauses, we use "I'd rather" followed by the base form of the verb (the infinitive without "to"). This is usually used to talk about what we prefer or want to do in the present or future. For example:


  • I'd rather stay at home tonight. (= I prefer to stay at home tonight.)



  • She'd rather not work on weekends. (= She doesn't want to work on weekends.)



  • They'd rather travel by train than by plane. (= They prefer traveling by train than by plane.)



  • He'd rather play soccer than basketball. (= He likes playing soccer more than basketball.)



Different subject




When the subjects of the two clauses are different, we often use "I'd rather" followed by a past tense verb. This is usually used to talk about what we want someone else to do or not do in the present or future. For example:


  • I'd rather you called me later. (= I want you to call me later.)



  • She'd rather he didn't drink so much. (= She wants him not to drink so much.)



  • They'd rather we went with them. (= They want us to go with them.)



  • He'd rather she cooked something else. (= He wants her to cook something else.)



Past tense




When we want to talk about what we preferred or wanted in the past, or what we wish had happened differently, we use "I'd rather" followed by have + past participle (the third form of the verb). This is also known as the past perfect subjunctive. For example:


  • I'd rather have stayed at home last night. (= I regret going out last night.)



  • She'd rather he had not drunk so much. (= She is unhappy that he drank so much.)



  • They'd rather we had gone with them. (= They wish we had gone with them.)



  • He'd rather she had cooked something else. (= He didn't like what she cooked.)



Much rather




Sometimes, we want to emphasize how strong our preference or desire is. In that case, we can use "much" before "rather" to add more intensity to the expression. For example:


  • I'd much rather stay at home tonight. (= I really prefer to stay at home tonight.)



  • She'd much rather not work on weekends. (= She really doesn't want to work on weekends.)



  • They'd much rather travel by train than by plane. (= They strongly prefer traveling by train than by plane.)



  • He'd much rather play soccer than basketball. (= He likes playing soccer a lot more than basketball.)



Or rather




Another way to use "rather" is with "or" to correct or clarify something we have said before. This is usually used when we realize we have made a mistake or we want to be more precise or honest. For example:


  • I like reading books, or rather, I used to like reading books. (= I don't like reading books anymore.)



  • She's my friend, or rather, my best friend. (= She's more than just a friend to me.)



  • They're going to Paris, or rather, they're planning to go to Paris. (= They haven't booked their tickets yet.)



  • He's a teacher, or rather, a professor. (= He's not just a teacher, he's a professor.)



Examples of "I'd rather"




Now that we have learned how to use "I'd rather" in different situations, let's look at some examples of how this expression can be used in everyday conversations.


Everyday situations




Here are some common scenarios where we can use "I'd rather" to express our preferences or wishes.



SituationExample


Choosing a movie to watchI'd rather watch a comedy than a horror movie.


Deciding what to eat for dinnerI'd rather have pizza than salad.


Making plans for the weekendI'd rather go hiking than shopping.


Giving advice to a friendI'd rather you talked to him face-to-face than texted him.


Expressing a regret about the pastI'd rather have studied harder for the exam.


Rejecting an offer politelyNo, thank you. I'd rather not drink any more wine.


Asking for a favor nicelyI'd rather you didn't tell anyone about this.


Telling someone your opinion honestlyTo be honest, I'd rather quit this job than work with him.


Funny situations




Sometimes, we can use "I'd rather" to make jokes or exaggerate our preferences by using absurd or extreme choices. Here are some examples of funny situations where we can use "I'd rather".



SituationExample


Avoiding an unpleasant taskI'd rather clean the toilet than do the dishes.


Declining an invitation rudelyI'd rather watch paint dry than go to your party.


Showing your dislike for someone stronglyI'd rather kiss a frog than him.


Making fun of yourself sarcasticallyI'd rather be bald than have this haircut.


Expressing your boredom dramaticallyI'd rather die than listen to another lecture from him.


Comparing two bad options humorouslyI'd rather eat a worm than a snail.


Showing your preference for something clearlyI'd rather have a million dollars than a penny.


Exercises on "I'd rather"




Now that we have seen some examples of "I'd rather" in different situations, let's try some exercises to practice this expression. You can check your answers at the end of the article.


Multiple choice




Choose the best option to complete each sentence.


I'd rather _______ a book than watch TV.


  • a) read



  • b) reading



  • c) to read



  • d) have read



I'd rather you _______ me the truth.


  • a) tell



  • b) told



  • c) have told



  • d) telling



I'd rather _______ to the party last night.


  • a) go



  • b) went



  • c) have gone



  • d) going



I'd much rather _______ at home than go out in the rain.


  • a) stay



  • b) stayed



  • c) have stayed



  • d) staying



I'd rather eat pizza, or rather, I'd rather _______ pizza.


  • a) make



  • b) made



  • c) have made



  • d) making



Fill in the blanks




Fill in the blanks with the correct form of the verb in brackets.



  • I'd rather __________ (not work) overtime today.



  • She'd rather he __________ (buy) her flowers instead of chocolates.



  • They'd rather __________ (study) harder for the test.



  • He'd much rather __________ (play) video games than do his homework.



  • I'd rather __________ (be) a bird than a fish.



Conclusion




In this article, we have learned how to use "I'd rather" to express our preferences, alternatives, or regrets. We have seen that the structure of "I'd rather" depends on whether the subject is the same or different in both clauses, and whether we are talking about the present, future, or past. We have also learned how to use "much" and "or" with "rather" to emphasize or clarify our statements. We have looked at some examples and exercises to practice this expression in different contexts.


Here are some tips to remember when using "I'd rather":



- Use the base form of the verb after "I'd rather" when the subject is the same in both clauses. - Use the past tense of the verb after "I'd rather" when the subject is different in both clauses. - Use have + past participle after "I'd rather" when talking about the past or hypothetical situations. - Use "much" before "rather" to add more intensity to your preference or desire. - Use "or" before "rather" to correct or clarify something you have said before. I hope you have enjoyed this article and learned something new. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below. Thank you for reading!


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about "I'd rather". If you have any other questions, please ask them in the comments section.



- Q: What is the difference between "I'd rather" and "I prefer"? - A: Both expressions can be used to talk about what we like more or want more in a given situation. However, "I prefer" is more formal and polite than "I'd rather", which is more casual and direct. Also, "I prefer" is followed by a noun or a gerund (the -ing form of the verb), while "I'd rather" is followed by a verb. For example: - I prefer coffee to tea. (= I like coffee more t


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